Art & Entertainments

INDULGE presents personal stories of resiliency, hope and strength from Miami’s community leaders

At INDULGE, we like to think outside the box. For our team, it’s all about the stories behind the people belonging to our diverse community that we feature in every issue and now as part of our limited editorial series MOSAIC. In the past four weeks, we have brought you personal stories of resiliency, hope and strength from Miami’s community leaders — each walking us through their experience during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak. Today, we continue in our mission to present our readers with relatable and oftentimes moving examples of inspiration in a challenging time. Our commitment as a top regional publication is to further examine how our melting pot of cultures and personalities is the very reason that South Florida has become a mosaic to be inspired by.

Because we represent Miami’s diverse community.

Because we care.

Because every person has a story to tell.

Featured this week is

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Italy’s 20 greatest cities, according to our expert

This is Italy's greatest city. Do you recognise it? - getty
This is Italy’s greatest city. Do you recognise it? – getty

With Italy reopening to tourists, which city should be first on your wishlist? Let Tim Jepson be your guide

No list of top-ranked cities is definitive, but what fun to compile one. And not just any list, but a list of cities you’d want to visit, even live in; a list that in Italy, with 20 such cities and counting, sees you spoilt for choice. 

What Italians call a city (una città) we might call a town (un paese), in part a legacy of Italy’s medieval city states – once a city, always a city – even if these “cities” today are not what they were. 

One or two of these former cities I have included; others, such as Lucca, Matera, Urbino and Ravenna – for all that they are superb places to visit – are more up for

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Free Food, Free Speech and Free of Police: Inside Seattle’s ‘Autonomous Zone’

A gathering on Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in the Seattle neighborhood of Capitol Hill, where protesters have established an "autonomous zone." (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times)
A gathering on Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in the Seattle neighborhood of Capitol Hill, where protesters have established an “autonomous zone.” (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times)

SEATTLE — On the streets next to a police station in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, protesters and officers spent a week locked in a nightly cycle of standoffs, at times ending with clouds of tear gas.

But facing a growing backlash over its dispersal tactics in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, the Seattle Police Department this week offered a concession: Officers would abandon their building, board up the windows and let the protesters have free rein outside.

In a neighborhood that is the heart of the city’s art and culture — threatened these days as rising tech wealth brings in gentrification — protesters seized the moment. They reversed the barricades to shield the liberated streets and laid claim to several city

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a rare chance to gasp at Iran’s many splendours

Samira Ahmed by the Bridge of Shadirwan in Shushtar - BBC
Samira Ahmed by the Bridge of Shadirwan in Shushtar – BBC

Samira Ahmed was granted a rare opportunity to journey into the heart of Iran for BBC Four’s Art of Persia, and she didn’t waste it. At many points in this first of three instalments I found myself gasping at the sheer magnificence of the sites she was showing us, and the beauty of the objects found there. The vast, desert ziggurat at Chogha Zanbil, relic of a lost world; the ruins of Persepolis and the grand tomb of its ruler, Darius the Great. These are sights that few Westerners will get to see in real life.

A lesser presenter would have been content to make this into a travel programme, with the occasional observation about the Iranian people. But Ahmed is clever and curious, and you sense that this is one of the great projects of her career.

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