Though COVID-19 tests our resilience, art and culture will keep us strong

The arts are taking it on the chin right now. As a recent headline in Andres Viglucci’s recent story “Miami’s arts and culture were flourishing. Now, of course, they’re being battered by the coronavirus” declared. Dennis Scholl, head of Oolite Arts, eloquently followed up in an April 12 oped, “Art will get us through this pandemic. Support the Miami artists who create it” with a call to come to the aid of local artists.

In that spirit, I write to say, Miami’s arts and culture will be resilient. Through this challenging moment, art is the one thing that we all will need to make sense of our time sheltering-in-place, “togetheralone” and working from home.

Books, films, music, videos of dancers, actors and performers, and live DJ sets on a variety of social media all are acts of creativity that bind us together and will get us through these traumatic

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6 Beauty Trends From Latinx Cultures

Jenna Brillhart and Jesse Blanner, HelloGiggles

With the Latinx diaspora expanding over 20 countries, “Hispanic” isn’t a one-size-fits-all term—especially when it comes to beauty and style. As Hispanic womxn, we’re challenging these narratives by embracing all aspects of our culture and choosing which ones are right for us. This Hispanic Heritage Month, HelloGiggles will be taking a deep dive into the beauty of our culture through Mi Cultura, Mi Belleza. We’ll be featuring essays about hair and identity, giving beauty tips from our abuelitas, highlighting the unique style of the Afro-Latina community, and more.

Beauty trends within the Latinx community go beyond the latest TikTok fad or new lipstick launch. They’re enriched with culture, influenced by history, and are often passed down by generations from abuelitas to tías to nietas. And with so much richness within the Latinx beauty space, it’s important to highlight the different trends from

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As big leagues prepare to return amid pandemic, memories of when barrio baseball ruled East L.A.

Conrad Munatones goes through old photos at his home in San Dimas. He fondly remembers the days when baseball in the barrio "was quite a thing." <span class="copyright">(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Conrad Munatones goes through old photos at his home in San Dimas. He fondly remembers the days when baseball in the barrio “was quite a thing.” (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

The Dodgers were still in Brooklyn and Dwight D. Eisenhower was still in the White House the last time Southern California went this deep into the summer without a Major League Baseball game.

For Conrad Munatones, then a 20-year-old catcher from East Los Angeles, the big leagues were an East Coast thing, like Broadway plays or Philly cheesesteaks.

“When someone said the Brooklyn Dodgers, I thought that meant Brooklyn Avenue,” he remembered.

Two minor league teams played in Los Angeles, but to Munatones, baseball meant Sunday doubleheaders at Belvedere and Evergreen parks, where neighborhood legends made their names playing for teams like Eastside Beer, Ornelas Food Market and the Carmelita Chorizeros. The games drew hundreds of people to

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what next for the great art galleries of the North?

Squeezed between successive waves of lockdowns and restrictions, galleries in the north of England are being forced to rethink their business models. For institutions such as Manchester Art Gallery, or Bluecoat in Liverpool, the Culture Recovery Fund has provided a temporary lifeline, but questions remain as to what will happen after March.

Even prior to this second national lockdown, visitor figures had been restricted to accommodate social distancing: Baltic in Gateshead, which would welcome 3,000 on a good Sunday, hit capacity last weekend at 500. The entrepreneurial culture of the last two decades, under which arts organisations were encouraged to generate significant income from commercial activities, now appears unsustainable.

“What we’re seeing is a complete collapse of our income model,” explains Sarah Munro, director of Baltic. Support from Arts Council England, Gateshead Council and Northumbria University accounts for about 60 per cent of the gallery’s budget. Until this year, car

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