artists

Queer artists of color dominate 2021’s must-see LGBTQ art shows

As the world’s top art museums strive — like everyone — to return to some sense of normalcy after a year of pandemic-induced chaos, an exciting new landscape of LGBTQ-themed art shows has begun to unfold for 2021, one in which queer artists of color are perhaps better represented than they’ve ever been before.

From emerging talents like Naima Green, Salman Toor and Shikeith to more established artists like Zanele Muholi, Julie Mehretu and Laura Aguilar, Black and brown voices are headlining a bold lineup of global exhibitions by queer artists in the coming months.

Here are the top current and imminent shows that you should safely do your best to see — noting of course that museums are still subject to ever-shifting local lockdown restrictions. Temporary closings are noted below and accurate as of press time, but they are dependent on shifting pandemic winds.


Anastacia-Reneé: ‘(Don’t Be Absurd) Alice

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Artists say Cuba government agrees to dialogue, tolerance

HAVANA (AP) — A group of Cuban artists and intellectuals say they won an unusual government vow of greater tolerance for independent art on Saturday after a demonstration in front of the Culture Ministry.

About 20 artists had gathered Friday and the crowd grew to 200 by late night, when Vice Minister Fernando Rojas and the directors of several associations affiliated with the governing Communist Party met with delegates of the demonstrators until after midnight.

The officials agreed to talks on “an agenda of multiple topics with proposals by both sides,” said writer Katherine Bisquet. In addition, “We will be able to meet without being harassed in independent spaces. There is a truce for independent spaces.”

The demonstration, and official willingness to deal with the participants is unusual in a country whose government historically has had little tolerance for open protest, tends to label dissenters as tools of its enemies

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Google AR app update allows users to see dinosaurs, ancient sea creatures and artists’ masterpiece in their home

Credit: Google
Credit: Google

Google’s Arts and Culture application now lets you view prehistoric creatures and great artworks in augmented reality.

The new additions to the app are divided into four subsections: animals, space, history, and art. The app is available on both iPhones and Android phones.

In a blog post, the search giant promoted a number of ancient beings including the cambropachycope, a ancient crustacean whose head was covered in eyes.

Other animals include the duck-billed Amurosaurus dinosaur and the opabinia, a shrimp-like creature that lived 500 million years ago and had five eyes.

For space fans, Google has rendered the command module from Apollo 11 as well as Neil Armstrong’s A-7L spacesuit.

There is also a great array of artworks from famous artists including Da Vinci, Monet, and Japanese artist Hokusai.

As well as specific objects, Google has also rendered certain areas in augmented reality, such as

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More than 100 artists are painting Black Lives Matter murals on boarded-up windows in Fort Wayne, Indiana

  • After George Floyd’s death, protests broke out in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and some downtown shops were damaged.

  • Thermopolis Smith III, an artist who goes by “Phresh Laundry,” was one of 100 local artists chosen to paint Black Lives Matter murals on boarded-up businesses.

  • A public art organization called Art This Way helped connect the artists with business owners, who will get to keep the art on their property.

  • Phresh Laundry says that painting helped him out of his lowest moments of life, and he hopes his work can inspire others, too.

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Editor’s note: The following contains language about suicide.

Theoplis Smith III — otherwise known as Phresh Laundry — is a self-taught artist whose latest paintings are on the boarded-up businesses of Fort Wayne, Indiana.

“With the recent passing of George Floyd, this kind of got the city up in the

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