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The Weeknd Gifts 150 Free Meals to Florida Healthcare Workers in Honor of Black History Month



The Weeknd wearing a suit and tie: GP Images/Getty The Weeknd


© Provided by People
GP Images/Getty The Weeknd

The Weeknd is giving back this Black History Month.

The Grammy winner, 30, teamed up with Postmates to gift 150 free meals to Florida healthcare workers at AdventHealth Carrollwood hospital in celebration of the monthlong observance. Each meal was prepared by Mama’s Southern Soul Food, a popular Black-owned restaurant in Tampa Bay. The Super Bowl showdown — where The Weeknd will headline the Pepsi Halftime Show — kicks off at the city’s Raymond James Stadium on Sunday.



The Weeknd wearing a suit and tie


© GP Images/Getty
The Weeknd

Food lovers can order from one of The Weeknd’s favorite, local Black-owned eateries by selecting to view “The Weeknd’s Highlights” menu in the Postmates app. The “I Feel It Coming” hitmaker is the first star to collaborate with Postmates for their national Black History Month campaign.

“It’s the first day of #BlackHistoryMonth and we’re kicking it off with @theweeknd

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Antwaun Sargent Discusses Black Photographers

If you haven’t heard of curator and critic Antwaun Sargent, you are missing out on one of the most brilliant contemporary voices on photography. The 32-year-old just joined the Gagosian gallery as director after a decade of writing about the art scene and one year after his first book, The New Black Vanguard, was released. It has become an instant classic, highly recommended by editors across the industry and taught in art schools; the book highlights the complex and personal ways that photographers grapple with expression and identity.

“For me, that link between the past and the present and the future was really important,” Sargent told BuzzFeed News. “When you say something like ‘the new,’ it automatically points to a history that has largely been unseen, unrecognized. The acknowledgment of these young photographers is an investment in the future. We talk about the future as though we don’t control

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Analyzing Black Pop Culture Got Me Through 2020

Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy

From ELLE

It’s 2020. There’s a global pandemic, my state is on fire, government officials are showing disrespect for Black bodies and disdain for Black lives, a new piece of society-shaking news comes out every day…and I’m spending every spare minute bingeing Girlfriends and reading tweets about Black art.

Black pop culture has kept me sane through the trash fire that has been this year. I don’t care if it seems frivolous amidst an ongoing global crisis—it brings me joy. In these times when I can’t see my family and friends in person, I find relaxation in revisiting a classic or obsessing over a new form of art. I process my feelings as I watch and listen, and giving Black pop culture attention—through appreciation or critique—reinforces that Black stories and Black life are important. Now more than ever, I need depictions of Black joy and strength

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Black Creatives Are The Future In ‘Art Is Revolution’ Virtual 3D Exhibit

Creating a more equitable future requires the ability to dream of something better. So the fourth and final installment of “Art Is Revolution (AIR),” our 3D virtual exhibit celebrating groundbreaking Black creators, focuses on the future.

“The artists this week are paving the way into new art and tech,” said Danielle Elise, curator of “Art Is Revolution” and founder of the All Black Creatives foundation and agency. “They are making us conscious of things we do not yet see.”

The installation spotlights art that both imagines what the future will look like and brings together cutting-edge applications for art and tech, she says. “Afrofuturism is a beautiful form of art that depicts both the past and the future of Black culture worldwide. We can imagine things as they were and also as they may be.”

HuffPost teamed with All Black Creatives and RYOT, Verizon Media’s immersive storytelling production house,

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