culture

Cancel culture should not mean art by offensive people is ‘burned’, says Hugh Bonneville

Hugh Bonneville as Roald Dahl

Hugh Bonneville as Roald Dahl

Cancel culture should not mean that work by offensive people is ‘burned’, Hugh Bonneville has said ahead of his performance as Roald Dahl.

The Downton Abbey actor urged caution over the trend of publicly denouncing celebrities as he believes there is a way of ‘balancing’ how we regard their work without condoning their offensive views or actions.

Bonneville also expressed his confusion over how imaginative people can be while producing films and art without offending people, asking ‘what dark corners are we allowed to explore and not explore?’

The 57 year old stars as Roald Dahl in his latest role for movie To Olivia – and said though he ‘decries’ the anti-Semitic views the author held, he did not carry that into his portrayal as it ‘was not relevant’.

He shared his views on cancel culture while appearing on BBC podcast Loose Ends, having been

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Elgin art exhibit celebrates Black culture in America

When Elgin artist Freddrick D. Wimms was asked just after Christmas to curate an art exhibit for Black History Month, he didn’t have much time and didn’t know what he wanted the show to be. But he did have an idea for a name.

“Black Then, Black Now, Black in the Middle …”

“When I set the name, I had no idea what the show was gonna be,” Wimms said. “I knew it couldn’t be based just on Black history. It had to be about the essence of Black culture, and then that will reflect on Black art and that will reflect Black history.”

Wimms ended up with the idea to tell the story of how Black culture in America was born out of the darkness of slavery, how far it had come up to and since the Civil Rights movement, and how far it can still go.

“This all

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Will money laundering laws end art world’s culture of secrecy?



a close up of a newspaper: Will money laundering laws end art world's culture of secrecy?


© Moneycontrol Contributor
Will money laundering laws end art world’s culture of secrecy?

When a Botticelli painting went under the hammer last month at Sotheby’s in New York for $92 million, it was assumed the buyer was a Russian oligarch since the bidding was done by an adviser to wealthy Russians.

But as art journalist Scott Reyburn told “The Week in Art” podcast, it’s not always that simple: “Sometimes very wealthy collectors use telephone bidders that imply a certain nationality just to guarantee their own anonymity… to throw us off the scent,” he said.

The ultra-wealthy prize that sort of confidentiality, and it also helps build the mystique and theatre in which auction houses like to drape themselves.

Lately, however, regulators in Europe and the United States are out to spoil the fun, arguing that this culture of secrecy is ripe for exploitation by criminals.

New anti-money-laundering rules mean art

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The Culture Lover’s February Guide

Photo credit: Design by Ingrid Frahm
Photo credit: Design by Ingrid Frahm

From Harper’s BAZAAR

Part of staying fulfilled (and sane) during the pandemic is about finding and participating in things you love. Fittingly, February’s culture lineup is stacked with a diverse assortment of in-person and virtual events that will make your heart sing. Among them: an out-of-this-world comedy variety show, stunning choreographic premieres, an innovative art fair scattered across New York, and a Zoom reunion reading of a play written by Tony Award winner Billy Porter. To round it all out, the Met Opera will be presenting two weeks of free nightly streams of performances starring legendary African-American performers in honor of Black History Month.

1. Walls for a Cause NYC
Ongoing

The Brooklyn gallery We Buy Gold and Orange Barrel Media have teamed up to organize Walls for a Cause NYC, a multi-site public art project and online exhibition that benefits the urban farm

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