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Dave Hickey, prolific and provocative art critic, dies at 82

Famed art critic Dave Hickey, known for biting opinions and stirring commentary on the creative scene, has died.

The prolific writer, who was also a self-described “sissy,” “feminist,” “serial monogamist,” “big quitter” and “pirate,” published a number of essays throughout his illustrious career examining art and culture. Hickey died of heart disease Nov. 12 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Los Angeles Times confirmed with his widow, Libby Lumpkin. He was 82.

“Dave’s a cross between Ralph Waldo Emerson and Joe Cocker — profoundly American, profoundly democratic and profoundly independent-thinking,” said art writer David Pagel in 2014. “He’s almost a heretic in the church of art. He makes people mad because he wants them to think for themselves.”

Born Dec. 5, 1938, in Fort Worth, Texas, Hickey collected several prestigious honors for his musings, including a Peabody Award, a MacArthur Fellowship and the Frank Jewett Mather award for art criticism.

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Robin Miller, journalist who captivated race fans with unfiltered takes, dies at 71

INDIANAPOLIS — Robin Miller was brash, unfiltered, no nonsense, self deprecating and the first to call himself a moron. He was also the man with a pen who captivated race fans with his unmatched knowledge of auto sports and who, under the radar, did good deeds for people and was fiercely loyal to friends.

Miller died Wednesday after a four-year battle with cancer. He was 71.

Miller, a member of the 2021 Motorsports Hall of Fame class, was a self-proclaimed nonathlete who wore baggy pants and sweatshirts with faces of drivers adorning the fronts. He lived on a diet of burgers from The Workingman’s Friend, Long’s Bakery doughnuts and candy.

He was a college dropout who got a break answering phones at the city’s biggest newspaper when he was 18. He was a volunteer for his racing idol, Jim Hurtubise, and then promptly got fired after botching a paint

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Art Cervi, Detroit TV’s Bozo the Clown in the 1960s and ’70s, dies at age 86

Art Cervi shaped musical tastes of Detroit baby boomers as talent coordinator for the dance show “Swingin’ Time,” then found a new career by hiding in plain sight behind Bozo the Clown’s bulbous red nose and entertaining countless thousands of younger fans.

Cervi, who reached an enormous audience that never knew his name, died Monday at his home in Novi. He was 86.

Several Bozos appeared on Detroit television between 1959 and 1980. Cervi played the character the longest — from 1967 until 1975 on Channel 9 (CKLW-TV) and then on Channel 2 (WJBK-TV) until he, and Bozo, left the air in 1980.

The size of Cervi’s audiences as Bozo probably makes him one of the biggest stars in Detroit TV history. No one in Detroit, however, would have recognized Cervi on the street. He had a clause written into his contract requiring that he be chauffeured to the station

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Elijah Moshinsky, Met Opera Director With Fanciful Touch, Dies at 75

His anti-picture-book concept, with a stark set, proved a more effective fit for the vocally powerful, dramatically volatile Mr. Vickers. The production (which can be seen on video) and Mr. Vickers’s performance, were triumphs, and changed the general understanding of the opera.

The next year, Peter Hall, the director of the National Theater in London, invited Mr. Moshinsky to direct a production of Thomas Bernhard’s play “The Force of Habit,” which Mr. Moshinsky described in the BBC interview as a comedic parable in which a “group of circus performers try to play Schubert’s ‘Trout’ Quintet, but can’t.” The production was a dismal failure, running for just six performances.

But that same year Mr. Moshinsky found his footing with an acclaimed production of Berg’s “Wozzeck” for the Adelaide Festival, presented by the Australian Opera (now Opera Australia). Over subsequent years he directed more than 15 productions for the

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