joy

Garrett Bradley Reminds Us That Black Joy Always Existed

Garrett Bradley’s quicksilver, imperious video installation “America,” at the Museum of Modern Art is an indictment wrapped in a celebration. Completed in 2019, it reimagines some of the signal events of Black life and culture in the United States during the early decades of the 20th century — reclaiming lost or overlooked pieces of history in a display of inexhaustible narrative and spatial complexity.

This is Bradley’s first solo exhibition in a New York museum, her first foray off the single screen into three-dimensional space and the second in a series of collaborative exhibitions mounted by MoMA and the Studio Museum in Harlem. Basically, the larger, older institution provides the space; the smaller, younger one, the expertise. It was organized by Thelma Golden, the Studio Museum’s director and chief curator, and Legacy Russell, its associate curator.

Like other Black artists of her generation — among them the painter Amy Sherald

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‘Agnes Joy’ Director Opened Film With Vomit Scene to Capture Characters’ ‘Raw’ Relationship (Video)

Silja Hauksdóttir, the director and one of the writers of “Agnes Joy,” says she opened the film with a graphic vomiting scene to capture the “raw” relationship between its characters.

The film, Iceland’s entry into the Academy Awards International Film category, explores the explosive relationship of daughter Agnes (Donna Cruz) and her mother Rannveig (Katla Þorgeirsdóttir) as Agnes seeks independence from her frustrated, dissatisfied mother’s controlling ways. Their world is upended still more when a seductive new neighbor moves into town.

“Raw” was how TheWrap’s Joe McGovern described the movie’s first scene, in which hungover teenage daughter Agnes (Donna Cruz) is shown vomiting in a bathroom, only to be broken in on by her outraged mother. Rannveig is more concerned about whether Agnes will be still able to perform on the violin than her daughter’s plight. When McGovern asked Hauksdóttir about the creative choice, she agreed with his assessment.

“The

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Discover the joy of a game that transports you into the mythologies of ancient India

"Raji: An Ancient Epic" transports players to ancient India. <span class="copyright">(Nodding Heads Games)</span>
“Raji: An Ancient Epic” transports players to ancient India. (Nodding Heads Games)

I played an hour of “Raji: An Ancient Epic” before I stopped and restarted. While it’s not uncommon for players to reboot a game after learning its basic controls, that wasn’t what made me want to begin again. “Raji: An Ancient Epic” reminded me of a sensation I hadn’t thought about much during the pandemic: the feeling of exploring and discovering a new place.

“Raji: An Ancient Epic” isn’t a replacement for a vacation, of course — no video game or virtual reality experience is yet that transportive — but it sparked a desire to analyze, to examine and to understand the in-game surroundings and its inspirations. A game that could be completed in a weekend stretched into a full week as I began writing down the names of deities such as Mahishasura and Kali for further research.

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