pandemic

How Art Lovers Weathered the Coronavirus Pandemic in 2020

The last “normal” art-world event I attended, on March 12, was the opening of Kyle Staver’s exhibition at Zurcher Gallery, in downtown New York. The usual crowd gathered to savor Ms. Staver’s idiosyncratic updates on history painting—a waterborne Ophelia; Susanna in a hammock, flanked by tigers; the enigmatic Venus and the Octopus—and admire her exuberant conceptions, sinuous figures, and brooding color. The only sign of anything out of the ordinary was the absence of embraces. Just as at the art fairs the previous week, elbow bumps replaced air kisses. The next day, everything began to change. Isolation was recommended. Galleries and museums closed. Studio visits ended. Scheduled exhibitions were indefinitely postponed. Since it seemed irresponsible to write about art seen only virtually, my world altered abruptly.

Museums, galleries and artists adapted quickly to the new situation, expanding and intensifying their existing online activities, rapidly improving what was already there

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Will there be a monument to the COVID-19 pandemic?

Editor’s Note: Dr. Emily Godbey is a professor of art and visual culture at Iowa State University. In this article, she discusses how plague monuments were used to commemorate victims of past disease outbreaks. She also looks at temporary memorials for COVID-19 and examines why plague memorials are not as prolific as war memorials.

Which disease outbreaks have been memorialized around the world?

Diseases like the bubonic plague, cholera, the 1918 influenza pandemic (“Spanish Flu”), AIDS, and even SARS have monuments, although some are more modest than others.

They are relatively uncommon, however, when compared with monuments to wars, political regimes, and more visible tragedies, such as 9/11 or the Holocaust. However, they are present in many places.

What are some notable plague monuments and what do they commemorate? 

The bubonic plague broke out several times in different parts of the world between the 6th century BC and the 19th

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What Will Monuments to the COVID-19 Pandemic Look Like? | Best Countries

Editor’s Note: Dr. Emily Godbey is a professor of art and visual culture at Iowa State University. In this interview, she discusses how plague monuments were used to commemorate victims of past disease outbreaks, temporary memorials for COVID-19 and why plague memorials are not as prolific as war memorials.

A short history of plague monuments.

What are some of the past disease outbreaks that have been memorialized around the world?

Diseases like the bubonic plague, cholera, the 1918 influenza pandemic or “Spanish Flu,” AIDS, and even SARS have monuments, although some are much more modest than others. They are more uncommon when compared with monuments to wars, political regimes, and more visible tragedies such as 9/11 or the Holocaust. However, they are present.

The Plague of Ashdod painting by Poussin. The subject of this painting comes from a story in the Book of Samuel in the Old Testament of the Bible about the Plague of Ashdod.
Poussin, The Plague of Ashdod, 1630. Poussin painted this during a plague that took place in Italy from 1629 to 1631, which influenced his accurate portrayal of
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Meow Wolf was set to transform themed entertainment in Vegas and beyond. Then came the pandemic

Inside the Meow Wolf Las Vegas experience, Omega Mart is a grocery store experience that can transport you to other realms. <span class="copyright">(Meow Wolf)</span>
Inside the Meow Wolf Las Vegas experience, Omega Mart is a grocery store experience that can transport you to other realms. (Meow Wolf)

This was supposed to be the year that Meow Wolf became so integral to popular culture that, in the words of one of its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, it would be well on its way to becoming a “provider of themed entertainment and creative experiences on the level that people think of Disney, Universal and Marvel.”

And on March 8, as I spent a Sunday afternoon in the company’s Santa Fe, N.M., exhibition space, that boast didn’t seem so far-fetched.

Crouching down in one of Meow Wolf’s byzantine rooms I entered what appeared to a doorway and found myself in the back seat of a van-like contraption that seemed to have been willed into existence by the creator of some long lost TV show.

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