pandemic

Meow Wolf was set to transform themed entertainment in Vegas and beyond. Then came the pandemic

Inside the Meow Wolf Las Vegas experience, Omega Mart is a grocery store experience that can transport you to other realms. <span class="copyright">(Meow Wolf)</span>
Inside the Meow Wolf Las Vegas experience, Omega Mart is a grocery store experience that can transport you to other realms. (Meow Wolf)

This was supposed to be the year that Meow Wolf became so integral to popular culture that, in the words of one of its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, it would be well on its way to becoming a “provider of themed entertainment and creative experiences on the level that people think of Disney, Universal and Marvel.”

And on March 8, as I spent a Sunday afternoon in the company’s Santa Fe, N.M., exhibition space, that boast didn’t seem so far-fetched.

Crouching down in one of Meow Wolf’s byzantine rooms I entered what appeared to a doorway and found myself in the back seat of a van-like contraption that seemed to have been willed into existence by the creator of some long lost TV show.

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As big leagues prepare to return amid pandemic, memories of when barrio baseball ruled East L.A.

Conrad Munatones goes through old photos at his home in San Dimas. He fondly remembers the days when baseball in the barrio "was quite a thing." <span class="copyright">(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Conrad Munatones goes through old photos at his home in San Dimas. He fondly remembers the days when baseball in the barrio “was quite a thing.” (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

The Dodgers were still in Brooklyn and Dwight D. Eisenhower was still in the White House the last time Southern California went this deep into the summer without a Major League Baseball game.

For Conrad Munatones, then a 20-year-old catcher from East Los Angeles, the big leagues were an East Coast thing, like Broadway plays or Philly cheesesteaks.

“When someone said the Brooklyn Dodgers, I thought that meant Brooklyn Avenue,” he remembered.

Two minor league teams played in Los Angeles, but to Munatones, baseball meant Sunday doubleheaders at Belvedere and Evergreen parks, where neighborhood legends made their names playing for teams like Eastside Beer, Ornelas Food Market and the Carmelita Chorizeros. The games drew hundreds of people to

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